Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
. and that is to build some public support tap on the good feeling from his re-election to give -- as ryan pointed out. there's some democrats including powerful ones like harry reid that say medicare and medicaid have to be off the table. those democrats do not include president obama who has made it clear he's open to a discussion about medicare and medicaid. and you usually would think there's not enough time to do serious entitlement reform. but the fact is, we've been talking about this set of issues for a year and more, lots of blueprints out there, including simpson/bowles. i think it is possible that will be part of a deal that is reached before the end of the year. >> this morning, dick durbin didn't really want to get into specifics. you aren't hearing a lot of numbers from a lot of people, but did say he was encouraged. take a listen. >> if i sound bland and general at this point, it's exactly to the point he made. when the doors close and we sit down with revenue on one side, entitlements on the other, then we get specific and come up with a bipartisan plan. >> ryan, to susan's point of wh
congress so, while the election may have changed the atmosphere and sort of the story line for the members, the actual people themselves are still there. so they've not changed their ideologies at all. i think that the problem is that you have john boehner, president and mitch mcconnell negotiating with the exact same congress that they had when they couldn't make a deal the last time. so i think until the personnel change, i'm not sure you can get a deal. >> and juan kessler, the fact checker for "the washington post," has reported that, you know, you have to come from, like, some point point. you have to have a negotiating point to start with. he said democrats and republicans haven't even agreed on a baseline yet. they're about $3 trillion apart because of ending the wars, medicare, other cuts. so how do you come to some agreement in what is a numbers game really if you don't even have a number to start with? >> i think one of the things we'll see happen here is the idea of a grand bargain, of one deal that gets all this stuff averted between now and -- it's not going to happen. it does
elected. the only thing i am honoring is the oath that i take when i serve when i am sworn in in january. >> chambliss already made a similar statement last week. the question is is this a real softening of positions? does it give them room to make deal. >> two things. first, let's look at the real room being created. so far i haven't heard anyone say i am willing to raise marginal tax rates as part of a deal. they're arguing with the head of the antitax coalition about whether closing loopholes is breaking the pledge. it is pretty narrow. it does show they're frustrated because they were sent to washington to negotiate, make deals, make things happen and they find themselves ham strung by this guy that voters haven't really heard of and saying who elected him? >> a lot just know they don't want to go off the fiscal cliff. here is the question. if republicans are building to eliminate deductions for wealthy, make the wealthy pay more, is it too far for democrats to push to get rates increased? what's the difference? >> i think the real problem here with democrats as far as democrats are
to hear because it seems that before the election there was actually some uniform opinion this absolutely was going to get done by the end of the year. what changed? >> well, it's so easy to say in general we're going to work this out, talk, and have the nice photo-ops, but when it comes down to dollars and cents it's the same old argument that democrats want to see some kind of an extension of tax cults for those making less than $250,000 a year but not for the wealthy. and the republicans still want to see some proposed cut, some kind of numbers on how they're going to reduce entitlements, especially medicare spending. so we're not close to actually having those kind of talks yet. what we have right now is a pr phase, a public relations phase, where both sides are trying to work the business community or work main street behind their side of the argument. >> and it does seem that we have a split not just about what needs to get done or how we get to this deal, dana, but about the urgency of what would happen if we didn't come to a deal. the white house put out that 14-page report on mon
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4